We could measure the rate of universe's expansion via black hole collisions.

We could measure the rate of universe's expansion via black hole collisions.

Scientists may be able to utilise a black hole's final moments to reveal the universe's past.

Astrophysicists used colliding black holes to study the universe's origins, composition, and future.

The new approach, which the scientists name a "spectral siren," may reveal the universe's "teenage" years.

The Hubble constant, which measures how fast the universe is expanding, is hotly debated.

Varied approaches provide somewhat different responses, thus scientists are looking for better ones.

Checking the accuracy of this figure influences how we comprehend the age, history, and makeup of the universe.

The new study uses unique detectors to measure black hole collision echoes.

Two black holes colliding causes a space-time ripple that travels across the cosmos.

LIGO and Virgo have collected data from 100 pairs of colliding black holes.

How big the black holes were can be determined from the signal of each encounter.

The signal of each contact can be used to estimate the size of the black holes.

Scientists can compute the universe's expansion rate by measuring how that signal altered.

Holz and lead author Jose Mara Ezquiaga advise using new black hole data to calibrate models.

The authors call it the "spectral siren" method, which Holz and colleagues pioneered.